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U.S. Amateur Championship

Rules of Participation

  1. The Preliminary Rounds of the U.S. Amateur Championship will be conducted regionally on Sept. 18-20, 2020 (unless otherwise indicated). Championship Rounds will take place Nov. 4-8, 2020, at Stroker’s Sports Bar & Grill in Palm Harbor. The size and number of Preliminary Rounds will depend upon the total number of entries. In order to hold a preliminary, locations must have a minimum of 16 participants in a division. Maximum participation is based on size and number of tables at each individual location.
  2. Men may compete in the U.S. Amateur Championship only.  The Womens U.S. Amateur Championship is open to female contestants only. Female participants may play in either the U.S. Amateur Championship or the Womens U.S. Amateur Championship, but they must choose their event before participating in the Preliminary Rounds.
  3. You must be at least 18 years of age to participate.
  4. Entry fees are as follows: Preliminary Rounds-$50 for APA members ($75 for Non – APA members). There will be no refunds to entrants who are disqualified for any reason. No other refunds will be given after June 30.
  5. All players are encouraged to seek sponsorship (businesses, Host Locations, clubs, etc.) to help pay costs associated with participating in the U.S. Amateur Championship.
  6. Matches will be a combination of 8-Ball and 9-Ball. APA and Pro rules apply.
  7. This is a double elimination tournament that features a combination of 8-Ball and 9-Ball. In the U.S. Amateur Championship , all matches are a race-to-7, with the exception of the final round, which is a race-to-11. In the Womens U.S. Amateur Championship , all matches are a race-to-5, with the exception of the final round, which is a race-to-9.
  8. There will be an enforced casual dress code. Detailed information to follow to all registered participants.
  9. Professional players are not allowed to participate in the U.S. Amateur Championship. APA will consult with several professional tours concerning the status of any player. In addition, players who possess professional characteristics will not be allowed to participate. Professional characteristics include, but are not limited to: making the majority of one’s income giving exhibitions, giving lessons or playing pool. Please contact the APA if you think there is any possibility that you possess professional characteristics.
    APA has a nationwide network of representatives and maintains a list of professional players throughout the country. APA intends to check the amateur status according to the above guidelines on every entrant into the U.S. Amateur Championship. Those entrants found to be in violation will be consulted and given an opportunity to appeal; however, APA has the final authority to make the judgment. Entry fees for those entrants found to be in violation will not be refunded.
  10. APA reserves the right to rule on amateur status (professional or amateur) at any time before, during, or after the event.
  11. APA reserves the right to deny participation.
  12. Anyone entering must be an APA member in good standing. Those who are locally suspended are not eligible (DOES NOT APPLY TO NON-MEMBERS).
  13. APA reserves the right to disqualify anyone entering or participating under fraudulent circumstances.
  14. Disqualification will result in loss of all titles and awards.
  15. I understand APA may contact my employer to verify my employment.
  16. APA has the authority, at its sole discretion, to make modifications to the rules, formats or any other aspect of the U.S. Amateur Championship.
  17. Release of APA & Tournament Sponsors
    I, the undersigned, being of lawful age, as inducement for and in consideration of the agreement by American Poolplayers Association, Inc. (APA), verify that I may take part in the U.S. Amateur Championship (the Event) and hereby covenant and agree that APA and all other sponsors and their respective affiliates, directors, officers, employees and agents (collectively Releasees) shall not be liable for any damages arising from personal injuries, including death, and/or damage to property that I may sustain in any way which result from or arise out of my preparation for or any participation in the Event. I hereby fully and forever release and discharge and covenant not to sue Releasees from any and all claims, demands, damages, rights of action or causes of action, present or future, whether the same be known or unknown, anticipated or unanticipated, resulting from or arising out of my preparation for or participation in the Event.
    I warrant that I am in good health and have no physical condition that would prevent me from participating in the Event.
    This release is intended to be as broad and inclusive as permitted by law, and if any portion is held invalid, the balance shall continue in full legal force and effect. This release shall be binding on my heirs, executors, administrators and assigns.
    I have read and fully understand the above Release.
  18. Graphic/Video/Audio/Media Appearance Release
    In connection with my appearance at and participation in this Event and all related activities and my visit to the U.S. Amateur Championship, I give APA (and its licensees, designees and assigns) the full, unconditional and irrevocable right to (1) film, photograph, tape, record and edit me and to use my personal biographic information, including without limitation, my appearance, likeness, identity, name, nickname, behavior, actions, voice, and conversations at any time during the Event by use of any means, media or technology (collectively the “Appearance”), (2) use, broadcast, reproduce, distribute and exhibit my Appearance freely in any media or for any purpose, including for any and all advertising, promotional and commercial purposes, (3) edit, modify, adapt, make derivative works from, copyright and otherwise use my Appearance as APA chooses. I recognize that content of my Appearance (including how the content is edited or any of us may be depicted or portrayed) may be viewed as favorable, positive, humorous, embarrassing, unfavorable, or negative, and I hereby waive any claim that I may have against APA or any employee, agent, assign or licensee relating to how my Appearance is edited, depicted or portrayed in any work that may be created.  I expressly waive any claim of any right or interest in the Appearance and any compensation or other benefits for my Appearance in any media or distribution outlet. I acknowledge and agree that APA shall be the exclusive owner of all copyrights and other rights to and in connection with such Appearance, and APA shall have full rights to license others to use them in any manner at APA’s discretion.
  19. If any level of the U.S. Amateur Championship is canceled, or the place or date of any level of the U.S. Amateur is changed, for any reason, I understand that my only remedy is a refund of my entry fee.

Official Rules of the U.S. Amateur Championship

Each match for the U.S. Amateur Championship is a race-to-7 (5 games of 8-Ball and 8 games of 9-Ball), except the final round, which is a race-to-11 (8 games of 8-Ball and 13 games of 9-Ball).  Each match for the Womens U.S. Amateur Championship is a race-to-5 (3 games of 8-Ball and 6 games of 9-Ball) except the final round, which is a race-to-9 (6 games of 8-Ball and 11 games of 9-Ball). Once the format has been chosen, the entire set of that format must be completed before moving to the next format, unless the needed games have been won.  All rounds of play are Double Elimination Format except the final round, which is Single Elimination (extended race).

Jump cues will be allowed in this tournament.  It is also permissible to break down a cue or switch cues to make a jump shot.

Championship Qualification will not be postponed to the following year.  No exceptions.

 GENERAL DESCRIPTION

8-Ball is played with a cue ball and a rack of 15 object balls. The primary purpose of this game is for one player to pocket the solid balls numbered from 1 to 7 or the striped balls numbered from 9 to 15, and then pocket the 8-ball before their opponent. Each player’s category of balls is determined when the first player legally pockets a ball. For example, if the first ball pocketed in the game is the 3-ball, then that player must pocket the rest of the balls numbered 1 to 7 while the opposing player attempts to pocket all the balls numbered 9 to 15. The turn passes from one player to the next whenever the shooter fails to pocket a ball of their category or fouls. A player legally pocketing a ball of their category must continue to shoot. The player who pockets their entire category of balls first, then legally pockets the 8-ball, is the winner of the game. The 8-ball must be pocketed in a called pocket.

 9-Ball is played with a cue ball and nine object balls numbered 1 through 9. It is a rotation game, meaning the balls are shot in numerical order. The shooter must strike the cue ball into the lowest numbered ball on the table first. The game is over when the 9-ball is legally pocketed. A player retains their turn at the table as long as they strike the lowest numbered ball first, and legally pocket a ball. The shooter need not pocket the lowest numbered ball to continue shooting. For example, the shooter may strike the 1-ball into the 4-ball (a combination shot) thus pocketing the 4-ball and continue their turn at the table.  On their next shot, the 1-ball must again be struck first.  If the shooter shoots the lowest numbered ball into the 9-ball and pockets the 9-ball, the game is over.  Each individual game is won when the shooter legally pockets the 9-ball. 

  1. LAGGING – Players lag at approximately the same time, with the winner of the lag having choice of format (8-Ball or 9-Ball) or the break. The ball that stops closest to the head rail wins. It is permissible to strike the head rail. If the lagged balls make contact with each other, both players fail to strike the foot rail during the lag, or a ball stops in the jaw of a pocket, re-lag. Failure to strike the foot rail, or striking a side rail or any pocket, results in loss of lag. Players are discouraged from using the cue ball during the lag. Insisting upon lagging with the cue ball is considered a sportsmanship violation. The winner of each rack breaks in the next game. 
  1. RACKING – All balls should be frozen (touching) as tightly as possible. Balls are racked by the non-breaking player with the head (front) ball on the foot spot. The breaking player may request and receive a rerack. The loser of the lag, and/or the loser of any subsequent game, racks for the opponent. In each format, the ball placement in the rack is as follows:

8-Ball – All 15 balls are racked in a triangle, with the 8-ball in the center.  The remaining balls can be placed in any order.

9-Ball – The balls numbered 1 through 9 are racked in a diamond shape. The 1-ball is at the front of the rack, the 9-ball is in the center.  The remaining object balls can be placed in any order.

NOTE: “Rack your own” is not allowed. 

  1. BREAKING – The rack must be struck before a foul can occur. A player must break from behind the head string for the break to be considered legal; in addition, at least four object balls must be driven to the rails or a ball must be pocketed. The cue ball may not be shot into a rail before hitting the rack. 

The cue ball’s point of contact with the table is used to determine if it is behind the head string, also referred to as in. To make this determination simply compare the head string, an imaginary line connecting the two diamonds that are second from the head rail, to the cue ball’s point of contact. A ball that is dead-center on the head string is considered out, or not behind the head string.

The cue ball must make contact with the rack as follows to be considered legal:

8-Ball – The head ball or the second row of balls must be struck first. Failure to strike the head ball or second row of balls does not result in a foul.

9-Ball – The 1-ball must be struck first. Failure to strike the 1-ball first does not result in a foul. 

If the rack is struck, but the break does not qualify as legal, the balls are reracked by the non-breaking player and rebroken by the same player.

If the rack is struck, but the break does not qualify as legal and results in a scratch, the balls are reracked and broken by the opposite player.

Breaking safe or soft is not allowed. Breaking just hard enough to comply with this rule is not a guarantee against penalties. Break as hard as you can while maintaining control. 

  1. AFTER THE BREAK – Various circumstances can occur upon completion of the break. They are:
  • A foul on a legal break will result in ball-in-hand for the opponent.
  • No balls are pocketed; it is the opponent’s turn.
  • An object ball is pocketed; it is still the breaker’s turn.

8-Ball

a. If a scratch occurs on the break, the opponent receives ball-in-hand, which must be executed from behind the head string, shooting at a ball that is outside the head string. If an object ball is dead-center on the head string, or out, then it is playable. If it is in, the ball is not playable. If the two players cannot agree on whether an object ball is in or out, then a Tournament Official should be consulted. If a Tournament Official is consulted, their call is final. To intentionally shoot at a ball that is in is a sportsmanship violation. 

NOTE: The cue ball must be in as noted above before play can begin. This is not a foul; no penalty may be assessed. It is up to the opponent to check to be sure the cue ball is in before it is shot. If the cue ball is out, the shooter must readjust the cue ball to a position behind the head string.

b. If the 8-ball is pocketed on the break, it is a win unless the player fouls the cue ball, in which case it is a loss.

c. If one or more object balls from one category are pocketed on the break, that becomes the shooter’s category of balls.  

d. If balls of each category are pocketed on the break (for example, two solids and one stripe), it is still an open table. The breaker has the option to shoot any ball except the 8-ball (which would be a foul); any ball pocketed without fouling counts. If the shooter makes one ball of each category on their second shot, the table remains open; a miss or foul on the second shot results in an open table for the opponent. If the opponent then pockets a ball and fouls, it is still an open table.

NOTE: During an open table, a player can shoot a combination involving stripes and solids; the legally pocketed ball will determine their category of balls for the remainder of the game. The 8-ball may not be used as the first ball in a combination shot.

9-Ball

a. A foul on a legal break will result in ball-in-hand for the opponent anywhere on the table. Pocketed balls, if any, stay down (are not spotted), except the 9-ball.

b.If the 9-ball is pocketed on the break, this is a win unless the player scratches, in which case the 9-ball (any other available high numbered ball is adequate) is spotted and the turn passes to the opponent. If the foot spot is occupied by another ball, the 9-ball is placed directly behind that ball and as close to the foot spot as possible.

c.If one or more balls are pocketed on the break, it is still the breaker’s turn.

 NOTE: Push-outs are allowed.  It is a shot in 9-ball that requires announcing the intent to push-out, and then shooting the cue ball to a new position. The shooter doesn’t need to satisfy the legal shot rule (driving a ball to a rail after a legal hit). Push-outs can only be used immediately after the break, by the breaker if they pocketed a ball on the break, or by the incoming player if no balls were pocketed on the break. Any ball pocketed on a push-out does not count and will be spotted. The shooter’s opponent then has the option to shoot from the new position or tell the shooter to take the shot. Normal game rules apply from that point on.

  1. SHOOTING THE WRONG BALLS – Occasionally, a player mistakenly shoots the wrong category of balls (in 8-Ball) or the wrong numbered ball (in 9-Ball). The shooter may avoid a foul by asking the opponent which ball or category of balls they should be shooting. If asked, the opponent must answer honestly. If the shooter hits the wrong ball, a foul occurs as soon as the wrong ball is struck, regardless of whether the ball is pocketed or not.

 NOTE: If a foul is not called before the shooter takes a subsequent shot, and makes legal contact with a ball of their actual category (in 8-Ball) or the lowest numbered object ball on the table (in 9-Ball), it is too late to call the foul.   In addition, the following rules will then apply depending on the format:

  • 8-Ball – Once a player makes legal contact with the 8-ball, the player assumes control of that category of wrongly pocketed balls and can win the game by legally pocketing the 8-ball. In addition, if the sitting player does not call a foul before the opponent’s turn ends, and subsequently contacts the wrong ball during their turn, both players will assume the new category of balls for the remainder of the game. 
  • 9-Ball – Any balls pocketed prior to the foul being called will stay in the pocket, except the 9-ball, which will be spotted.
  1. COMBINATION SHOTS – Combination shots are legal, but striking the correct ball first is required.

8-Ball – The 8-ball may not be contacted first. If a player does not pocket one of their balls, but pockets an opponent’s ball, they lose their turn. No pocketed ball is spotted.

9-Ball – The lowest numbered ball on the table must be struck first. 

  1. POCKETED BALLS – Balls must remain in a pocket to be legal. If any ball, including the cue ball, goes in a pocket, but bounces back onto the playing surface, it is not considered pocketed and must be played from where it lies.  The shooter does not need to designate their intended ball or pocket during the shot, except when they are legally shooting the 8-ball.

NOTE 1: Once a ball has stopped all motion, it cannot move again without outside forces affecting it. Therefore, if a ball which has been hanging in a pocket for more than a few seconds suddenly drops, it is to be placed back on the table where it was originally sitting.

NOTE 2: If two balls become jammed in a pocket and are leaning of the edge of the slate to some degree, they are deemed pocketed. Drop them in the pocket and resume playing unless doing so ends the game. 

  1. BALLS ON THE FLOOR – Object balls that get knocked of the playing surface will be spotted on the foot spot. If the foot spot is taken, the ball will be placed directly behind the foot spot, as close to the foot spot as possible. If two or more balls are knocked on the floor, they are placed in numerical order with the lowest numbered ball closest to the foot spot. Spotted balls are placed frozen to one another.

8-Ball – It might occur that a player legally pockets a ball while simultaneously knocking some other ball(s) on the floor. In this situation, it is still their turn and the ball(s) is/are not spotted until their turn ends. If the ball on the floor is one of the shooter’s balls, then it is spotted when the shooter has pocketed all of their remaining balls. If the 8-ball is knocked on the floor, the shooter loses the game.

9-Ball – Balls that get knocked of the playing surface will be immediately spotted on the foot spot. The 9-ball is spotted:

a. Anytime it is knocked off the table other than when it is pocketed.

b. Anytime it is pocketed and the shooter scratches or otherwise fouls. 

  1. ACCIDENTALLY MOVED BALLS – Accidentally moved balls must be replaced, unless any of the accidentally moved balls make contact with the cue ball.   If accidentally moved balls make contact with the cue ball, it is a ball-in-hand foul, and no balls get replaced.
  • If the accidental movement occurs between shots the ball must be replaced by the opponent before the shot is taken.
  • If the accidental movement occurs during a shot, all balls accidentally moved must be replaced by the opponent after the shot is over and all balls have stopped rolling.

NOTE: An object ball that is in motion and makes accidental contact with a bridge, cue stick, etc., is not replaced.

 If, during the course of the shot, another ball stops in the position previously occupied by the accidentally moved ball, the opponent must place the accidentally moved ball, in a fair manner, as close as possible to its original position. 

  1. CLOSE HITS – Potential bad hit situations are usually fairly obvious. Disputes over these situations can almost always be avoided by having a Tournament Official watch the shot. The sitting player should protect themselves by stopping the game prior to the shot. The shooter is required to stop if their opponent wants the shot watched. Once a Tournament Official is asked to watch the shot, their call will stand and cannot be disputed.

In general, the shooter has the advantage in close hit situations. If the Tournament Official cannot determine which ball was struck first, such as a simultaneous hit, the call goes to the shooter. 

NOTE: If a Tournament Official is not asked to watch the hit, and the hit is disputed, the call will tend to favor the shooter. 

  1. ONE FOOT ON THE FLOOR – When a bridge is available, at least one foot must be on the floor while shooting. Failure to keep at least one foot on the floor is not a foul, but may result in a sportsmanship violation.

Wheelchair players – Players shooting from a wheelchair must remain seated in their wheelchair while shooting. If a player decides to exit the wheelchair to perform a shot, they must fully exit the chair. Players may not execute shots “half-in, half-out” of a wheelchair. 

NOTE: Players who have a legitimate need to use a stool, due to their height, are allowed to use one, provided they are able to move the stool by themselves and keep both feet on the stool. Additionally, they may stand on a stool when racking. 

  1. MARKING THE TABLENo one is allowed to mark the cloth in any way, including, but not limited to, using chalk to draw a line or wetting a finger to dampen the cloth. Players may be subject to sportsmanship violations for marking the cloth. It is permissible to set a piece of chalk on the hard surface of the rail. 
  1. FROZEN BALLSA frozen ball is a ball that is touching either another ball or a rail. In order for the frozen ball rule to be in effect, the ball must be declared “frozen” and verified as such by the shooter and their opponent. If the players in the match cannot agree, a Tournament Official may be asked to determine if a ball is frozen. 

Object ball frozen to a rail – To make a legal shot, after contacting a ball that is frozen to a rail, the shooter must either:

  • Drive the cue ball to any rail after the cue ball touches the frozen ball.
  • Drive the frozen ball to another rail or into a pocket.
  • Drive the frozen ball away from the rail and into another ball which, in turn, causes the frozen ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket, or causes the other ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket.

To make a legal shot, after simultaneous contact between a frozen ball and the rail it is frozen to, the shooter must either:

  • Drive the cue ball to another rail.
  • Drive the frozen ball to another rail or into a pocket.
  • Drive the cue ball off the rail and into another ball which, in turn, causes the cue ball to hit any rail, or causes the other ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket.
  • Drive the frozen ball off the rail and into another ball which, in turn, causes the frozen ball to hit any rail, or causes the other ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket.

Cue ball frozen to your own object ball – If the cue ball causes the object ball to move (by exerting force into the frozen ball, not by breaking contact with the frozen ball), it is considered contacted during the shot.

8-Ball – If you are shooting away from the object ball the cue ball is frozen to, in order to make a legal shot, you must contact another object ball, and then drive a ball to a rail or into a pocket. If the cue ball is frozen to the last ball of your category, the cue ball must separate from the object ball, then come back and make contact with the ball it was originally frozen to and drive a ball to a rail or into a pocket.

9-Ball – If you are shooting away from the object ball you are frozen to, in order to make a legal shot, you must contact the lowest numbered ball and drive a ball to a rail or pocket a ball. If the cue ball is frozen to the next ball in the rotation, the cue ball must separate from the object ball, then come back and make contact with the ball it was frozen to, and after contact, drive a ball to a rail or into a pocket. 

Cue ball frozen to your opponent’s ball – You must shoot away from the opponent’s ball. If the cue ball causes the opponent’s ball to move, which does not include breaking contact with the frozen ball, it will result in a foul.

  1. FOULSIf any of the following fouls are committed, the penalty is ball-in-hand for the opposing player. Make certain you have ball-in-hand before you touch the cue ball by confirming it with your opponent. Ball-in-hand is the advantage given to a player when their opponent scratches or otherwise fouls, whereupon the player may place the cue ball anywhere on the playing surface. 

EXCEPTION: In 8-Ball, a scratch on the break requires the ball-in-hand to be executed from behind the head string and contact made with a ball outside the head string. 

Even after having addressed the cue ball a player may, if not satisfied with the placement, make further adjustments with their hand, cue stick or any other reasonable piece of equipment. 

Only the player may officially call a foul, although anyone may suggest to the player that a foul should be called. 

NOTE 1: A foul that is not called when it occurs cannot be called once the next shot has been taken. 

NOTE 2: The three consecutive foul rule will not be used in this tournament. 

These are the only fouls resulting in ball-in-hand. All other violations are sportsmanship violations. The ball-in-hand fouls are:

a. If the cue ball goes in a pocket, on the floor, or otherwise ends up of the playing surface.

b. Failure to hit the correct ball first.

c. Failure to hit a rail or pocket a ball after contact. A rail must be struck by either the cue ball or any other ball after the cue ball contacts the object ball. If the ball bounces back onto the playing surface, it is considered to have struck a rail.

d. If, after making contact with a ball that is frozen to a rail, the shooter fails to:

  • Drive the cue ball to any rail after the cue ball touches the frozen ball.
  • Drive the frozen ball to another rail or into a pocket.
  • Drive the frozen ball away from the rail and into another ball which, in turn, causes the frozen ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket, or causes the other ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket.

If, after making simultaneous contact between a frozen ball and the rail it is frozen to, the shooter fails to:

  • Drive the cue ball to another rail.
  • Drive the frozen ball to another rail or into a pocket.
  • Drive the cue ball off the rail and into another ball which, in turn, causes the cue ball to hit any rail, or causes the other ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket.
  • Drive the frozen ball off the rail and into another ball which, in turn, causes the frozen ball to hit any rail, or causes the other ball to hit any rail or go into a pocket.

e. Intentionally jumping a cue ball over another ball by scooping it into the air.

f. Receiving advice regarding game strategy from anyone.

g. Touching or causing the cue ball to move, outside of a ball-in-hand situation.

h. Altering the course of a moving cue ball, including a double-hit.

i. Anytime the cue ball makes contact with an accidentally moved ball.

j. The cue ball does not touch any object ball during the course of a shot.

k. Touching another ball on the table, while placing or adjusting the position of the cue ball, during a ball-in-hand.  

  1. COACHING AND TIMEOUTS – Are not permitted. 
  1. EARPIECES – You are not permitted to wear earphones or non-electronic earplugs of any type during tournament play. This includes ear buds, headphones, headsets, Bluetooth devices, etc.  Hearing aids are allowed. 
  1. FORFEITS – A match will result in a forfeit if a player is not at the table and ready to begin within 15 minutes of the appointed time. The Tournament Director determines when a match is officially forfeited. 
  1. HOW TO WIN A GAME

8-BALL

a. You pocket all the balls of your category and legally pocket the 8-ball in a properly called pocket.

b. Your opponent pockets the 8-ball out-of-turn or knocks it on the floor.

c. Your opponent pockets the 8-ball in the wrong pocket.

d. Your opponent fails to properly call the pocket where the 8-ball is pocketed, and you call loss of game.

e. Your opponent fouls the cue ball and pockets the 8-ball.

f. Your opponent alters the course of the 8-ball or the cue ball in an attempt to prevent a loss.

g. Your opponent scratches or knocks the cue ball of the table when playing the 8-ball. 

NOTE 1: If your opponent is shooting at the 8-ball and misses it altogether, commonly referred to as a table scratch, they have fouled and you receive ball-in-hand. You do not win because of this foul. 

NOTE 2: You may not play the 8-ball at the same time you play the last ball of your category. The 8-ball must be pocketed through a separate shot.  If you pocket the 8-ball at the same time you pocket the last ball of your category, you lose the game.

9-BALL

You legally pocket the 9-ball. 

RULES OF CONDUCT

APA has established, and will strictly enforce, the following conduct rules for this Tournament and all Higher Level Tournament play:

a. No loud, abusive or profane language will be tolerated. You are an APA member to have a good time and to enjoy some friendly competition. If you experience a problem, one of the Tournament Officials will address it. Simply bring the matter to their attention. Remember that nearly every ruling will be seen as favoring one side or the other.  Each player is required to accept official rulings without causing a scene.

b. Unsportsmanlike conduct directed to the opposing player or a Tournament Official will not be tolerated.

c. Anyone involved in an incident that includes either physical abuse, violence, or the throwing of an item will be disqualified immediately, and immediately banned from the Tournament site.

d. Anyone caught hitting a cue against the table, wall, floor, etc., or recklessly swinging a cue will be disqualified immediately and be banned from the Tournament site.

e. Abusive behavior directed to the Tournament Director or any of their designates, including Tournament Officials, will not be tolerated.

f. Excessively slow play will not be tolerated. If your excessive slow play becomes a problem you will be entitled to one warning before any penalty is issued. 

The penalties for violating any of the Rules of Conduct detailed above are as follows: 

Except for incidents of slow play, a warning may or may not be given, and the Tournament Director can issue any of the four penalties below, regardless of whether any penalty has been previously issued, depending upon the severity of the situation. 

  1. Penalty Level 1 – Your opponent will be given ball‐in‐hand. If the player is still shooting, or already has ball‐in‐hand, then that player will be allowed to shoot until missing, and then be given ball‐in‐hand again.
  2. Penalty Level 2 – Your opponent will be granted the game.
  3. Penalty Level 3 – Your opponent will be granted the match.
  4. Penalty Level 4 – You will be ejected and/or disqualified. 

NOTE: If the violation or disturbance that caused a prior penalty to be levied does not cease, the Tournament Director or their designated assistant has the right to go from one penalty level to the next penalty level immediately.

 

 

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